review paper format

review paper format

Scientists commonly use reviews to communicate with each other and the general public. There are a wide variety of review styles from ones aimed at a general audience (e.g., Scientific American) to those directed at biologists within a particular subdiscipline (e.g., Annual Review of Physiology).
RESEARCHING A TOPIC

If you are considering writing a review paper, please take into consideration the following:
Review papers are high scholarly contributions articles written by experts who not only know very well the research and technical developments in the field but also are able to critically examine the state-of-the-art and express informed views and provide guidance/ideas of future developments of the research topic.

Review paper format
When doing research for your review, here is a list of questions to consider as you read through articles to potentially include:
Other tips and tricks are featured underneath this box.

Review paper format
Reviewing the literature is not stamp collecting. A good review does not just summarize the literature, but discusses it critically, identifies methodological problems, and points out research gaps [19]. After having read a review of the literature, a reader should have a rough idea of:
How can you organize the flow of the main body of the review so that the reader will be drawn into and guided through it? It is generally helpful to draw a conceptual scheme of the review, e.g., with mind-mapping techniques. Such diagrams can help recognize a logical way to order and link the various sections of a review [21]. This is the case not just at the writing stage, but also for readers if the diagram is included in the review as a figure. A careful selection of diagrams and figures relevant to the reviewed topic can be very helpful to structure the text too [22].

Review paper format
So how to approach writing a review article? What do you need to consider? Here’s 8 tips of some key things to consider:
When finding sources to evaluate, Angus Crake says that it’s critical that you “use multiple search engines/databases so you don’t miss any important ones.” For finding studies for a systematic review in medical sciences, read advice from NCBI.

References:

http://www.journals.elsevier.com/international-journal-of-machine-tools-and-manufacture/news/guidance-for-review-papers
http://guides.lib.umich.edu/c.php?g=283300&p=2915110
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3715443/
http://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/writing-a-review-article/
http://everynurse.org/blog/how-nurses-should-be-using-social-media/